The David and Lura Lovell Foundation Awards $1.2 Million in 2016

The David and Lura Lovell Foundation awarded $1.2 million in grants during 2016 to support projects related to mental health, integrative health and wellness, and youth access to the arts.  A new area of interest, gender parity, is currently under development. Since its founding in 1994, the Lovell Foundation has awarded more than $14 million in grants to nonprofit organizations in its core focus areas and for projects of special interest to second and third generation family members.

The Lovell Foundation was established with proceeds from the sale of the Colton Chemical Company in Toledo, Ohio, which David Lovell founded and grew for 25 years. When he died unexpectedly at the age of 66, his wife Lura and daughter Ann moved the foundation forward. It is based in Tucson, where Lura lived part time before her death in 2013, and Ann Lovell, board chair, has lived since 1989.

2016 awards in the foundation’s main areas of interest include:

Mental Health

  • $120,000 to Arizona Public Media (AZPM) toward development of a 60-minute documentary on the mental health of teens and youth. Production will include in-depth, diverse and thoughtful storytelling that engages viewers emotionally and exposes them to new perspectives, as well as an extensive community engagement project.
  • $35,000 to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) of Greater Toledo: $5,000 toward support of the Kidshop workshop for children who have a mental health diagnosis or a family member with a mental health diagnosis, and $30,000 toward support of education programs for families who have a loved one living with a mental illness.

Integrative Health and Wellness

  • $300,000, payable over two years, to the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine to develop the Integrative Health Self Care program (IHSC), a user friendly, online, interactive integrative health resource for the public. Developed with a motivational interviewing frame, it will search to uncover an individual’s motivation for lifestyle change and increase patient health and wellness. Collaboration with multiple partners will facilitate IHSC delivery to underserved populations nationwide. A coordinated research project will track IHSC effectiveness.
  • $25,000 to Interfaith Community Services (ICS) in Tucson, in sponsorship of their 2016 Annual Conference – Faith Communities & Well-Being: Mind, Body, and Spirit, which is an integral component of ICS’s whole health programming. The conference targets faith community staff and lay leaders, health professionals and the general public.  Esther Sternberg of the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine was a keynote speaker at the April event.
  • $50,000 to Tucson’s Elizabeth’s Health Center in support of their Behavioral Health Department, which plays a critical role in serving uninsured and under-insured patients at discounted rates. Insurance reimbursement helps, but is insufficient to subsidize these services. Lovell Foundation funds will also add 20 additional hours each week for the Licensed Certified Social Worker on staff.  This grant will enable St. Elizabeth’s to see additional patients and provide better supervision for their interns.
  • $200,000 to the University of Arizona College of Nursing for continued funding of the Integrative Nursing Faculty Fellowship (INFF) program. Within a three-year timeframe, INFF will establish the fellowship program, develop integrative nursing curriculum tools, establish a collaborative network of peer nursing colleagues, and build inter-professional relationships.
  • $8,000 to ProMedica Health System in Toledo, Ohio, toward funding of the 13th Annual Integrative Medicine Conference, Wellness across the Age Spectrum. The conference includes a free evening community event and full-day Continuing Medical Education conference designed for physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals.
  • $35,000 in 2016, plus $75,000 payable from 2017-2020, to The Victory Center toward providing additional units of service to cancer patients and survivors. Integrative therapies and programs supplement any medical treatment survivors may be seeking.  Participants range in age, diagnosis and economic status.  For 20 years The Victory Center has served cancer patients, survivors and family members in northwest Ohio and southeast Michigan at no cost.

Youth Access to the Arts

  • $8,000 to Tucson’s Invisible Theatre for Project Pastime, an interdisciplinary arts program designed to increase understanding and acceptance of the diverse qualities and gifts of mentally and physically challenged young people. Participants at Doolen Middle School receive twice-weekly instruction in music, drama, and dance for eight months each year. This culminates in a powerful and inspiring production of an original musical called THE ME INSIDE OF ME, which the students help to create as well as perform for community and school audiences.
  • $15,000 to the Toledo Museum of Art (TMA) toward the Art After School (AAS) program, serving children within local neighborhoods facing socio-economic and educational life challenges. AAS offers children who would otherwise have no means to come to TMA opportunities to learn about art, take classes, and connect with working artists.  AAS fosters skills in critical thinking, problem solving, communication and collaboration, and cultivates empathy.  The program partners with local youth service organizations and schools to provide free gallery and studio experiences throughout the school year and during the summer.
  • $70,000, payable over two years, to the Toledo Symphony Orchestra (TSO) toward Community Music Lessons (CML) and Young People’s Concerts. CML students are exposed to technical skills, performance expectations and a level of professionalism otherwise unavailable to them, and teachers double as mentors.  CML students participate in an annual spring recital.  TSO also invites students in grades 4-8 to Young People’s Concerts designed to incorporate lessons learned in the classroom with music.
  • $10,000 to the Tucson Museum of Art to advance the positive impact of the Family Destination Project by supporting the growth and improvement of its three existing components – Picture This!, the Creative Space, and Activity Guides – and the introduction of a fourth, a pilot drop-in program called School Break Sketch-In: a direct response to requests from families for more arts enrichment opportunities during school breaks and holidays. School Break Sketch-In will become an integral part of the Family Destination Project, providing greater opportunities for children to imagine, create and learn.
  • $15,000 to the Tucson Symphony Orchestra (TSO) as continued funding for Music in the Schools/Young People’s Concerts, which connect the classroom to the concert hall for more than 13,000 third through eighth graders from 90 schools, primarily in Tucson. This nationally-recognized program provides teachers with a standards-aligned education curriculum and in-school performance by TSO ensembles, and culminates each spring with the Young People’s Concerts performed by the full orchestra at the Tucson Music Hall.
  • $20,000 to the University of Arizona Foundation for the benefit of UA Presents – Lead Guitar. Lead Guitar students learn technique, music reading, theory, performance skills, and ensemble playing. Through these skills, they develop self-discipline, self-esteem, and the ability to work as a team – attributes that help them realize success throughout their lives. Lovell funding will support Lead Guitar programs in three additional schools, for a total of five, including Catalina High School, Amphitheater Middle and High Schools, Summit View Elementary and Roberts-Naylor K-8.

Passing On

Passing On is an Emmy award winning AZPM original documentary exploring death and dying through a series of compelling, personal and thought-provoking stories that engage viewers and provide valuable information about end-of-life planning.

The David and Lura Lovell Foundation Awards $150,000 To Six Toledo Nonprofit Programs

TOLEDO, OH – The David and Lura Lovell Foundation awarded $150,000 in grants this summer to support programs of six nonprofit organizations in Toledo, plus three other projects.

The family foundation funds projects related to mental health, integrative medicine, cultural / spiritual enrichment and philanthropic education. Since its founding in 1994, the Lovell Foundation has awarded more than $13 million to support those priorities.

The Toledo grant recipients are the National Alliance on Mental Health of Greater Toledo, Neighborhood Properties, ProMedica, Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo Symphony Orchestra and The Victory Center. All have previously received grants from the Lovell Foundation for a combined total of $1.7 million.

The Lovell Foundation was established with proceeds from the sale of the Colton Chemical Company, which David Lovell founded and grew in Toledo for 25 years. When he died unexpectedly at the age of 66, his wife Lura and daughter Ann moved the foundation forward. It is based in Tucson, where Lura lived part time before her death in 2013, and Ann Lovell, board chair, has lived since 1989.

The 2015 Toledo awards are:

  • NAMI Greater Toledo received $30,000 to continue its family educational support, outreach and advocacy programs. The foundation also awarded $5,000 for the new Kidshop Pilot Program, a support workshop for children who either have a mental health diagnosis or have a family member with a mental health diagnosis. Kidshop includes education and group work with a trained facilitator, as well as arts and crafts learning activies. Lura Lovell became a tireless advocate for mental health services in Ohio and nationally after learning to navigate the system for a son who suffers from serious mental illness.
  • Neighborhood Properties, Inc. is a pioneering nonprofit that provides supportive housing and peer support for adults who have severe mental illness. David and Lura Lovell were founding board members of NPI. David and two other businessmen led the acquisition, rehabilitation and organization of the first 40 units. Today NPI owns 550 apartment homes in Ohio at 60 locations in Lucas County and one each in Tiffin and Fostoria. A $10,000 grant was awarded for The Showcase Recovery Event, which highlights the artwork by the residents and creates a venue for poetry readings, music, dance and the visual arts.
  • ProMedica received a $5,000 grant from the foundation to support its 12th Annual Wellness Conference which includes a free evening public event and a day-long conference for physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals. The goal is to raise awareness of integrative medicine. The conference focuses on attaining wellness through an integrative, holistic approach that takes into account the whole person – body, mind and spirit – spanning all ages and all aspects of lifestyle.
  • Toledo Museum of Art received $15,000 to support its Art After-School Program. Each year, AAS provides more than 700 underprivileged children who may have no other access to the arts with art experiences and education. In the fall of 2015 TMA will implement new hands-on visual art experiences. Many community organizations are long-standing partners of this project. The new elements of the program not only offer students the opportunity to try new mediums, but also allow them to expand their experiences at the museum and remain engaged in multiple ways.
  • Toledo Symphony Orchestra programs ensure that all youth in the community have access to high-quality music education projects regardless of their socioeconomic status or the school they attend. A $35,000 foundation grant supports the Community Music Lessons program and Young People’s Concerts. During its 71st season, TSO will serve more than 12,000 students – providing coaching and instruction on instruments, professional music performances and life-enriching skills, including discipline, community participation, self-expression and self-confidence. TSO partners with the Toledo Public Schools, reaching a large number of students from low-income families.
  • The Victory Center provides professional services for cancer patients and cancer survivors, including massage, Reiki, aquatic exercise, counseling, reflexology, aromatherapy, support groups and nutritional guidance. The Lovell Foundation has supported The Victory Center’s provision of integrative and complementary therapies for the past 15 years. The 2015 grant award is $35,000 to help provide these services at no charge. There are currently 2,200 active persons in the Victory Center’s client database.

Three grants of $5,000 each were awarded to family-initiated projects – That Neighborhood Church in Toledo serves victims of sex trafficking; Camp Reel Stories in Oakland, Calif., allows teens to learn filmmaking from top female professionals, and Soul Shoppe, also in Oakland, offers hands-on programs where students practice empathy, resolve conflicts and have a say in shaping their school to be a safer place.

Over the past 20 years the Lovell Foundation has partnered with 60 local nonprofit organizations and supported a few projects that were national in scope. The Lovell Foundation is governed by three second-generation trustees and a board of advisors that includes family members and non-family members who have expertise in law, accounting, asset management, education, mental health and nonprofit administration.

The David and Lura Lovell Foundation Awards $2 Million To Support 15 Nonprofits Serving Southern Arizona

TUCSON, AZ – The Tucson-based David and Lura Lovell Foundation approved nearly $2 million in grants for 15 Tucson nonprofit organizations in the first quarter of 2015.

The three largest grants from the family foundation are: $620,000 to Interfaith Community Services, $545,938 to the University of Arizona College of Nursing and $300,000 for the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine. The entire grant allocation totals $2,026,338 for 23 distinct projects, including six family-initiated projects located in various parts of the country. Highlights include:

  • Interfaith Community Services received awards for two projects over the next three years. A grant for $560,000 will establish a program that connects faith communities with healthcare facilities to provide support for at-risk and vulnerable patients who need non-medical support after discharge from the hospital. Such support has been shown to reduce re-admissions and improve quality of care and patient satisfaction. This is modeled on a successful evidence-based program in Tennessee.

The second grant provides $60,000 for ICS to continue to provide mental health training in the community to help people learn the facts about and recognize the signs of mental illness and how to address crisis and non-crisis situations. Interfaith Community Services was established in 1985 and now works with nearly 80 faith-based communities that provide volunteer services for the elderly, disabled and disadvantaged.

  • UA College of Nursing, established in 1957, is ranked in the top 6 percent of nursing programs in the nation. The Lovell Foundation grant, over three years, will help the college transform nursing education to include more extensive integrative nursing knowledge and skills that can help improve the outcomes of patients with acute and chronic healthcare issues. Mary Koithan, associate dean of the college, is leading the project. She is co-author of the widely used text “Integrative Nursing,” published last year that is already in its third printing.
  • Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine plans to open an Integrative Health clinic in Tucson in late 2015, after opening its first clinic in Phoenix in 2012. The clinic became a successful model of care delivery where patients receive individualized comprehensive primary care with a strong focus on personal empowerment, prevention, self-care and optimal health. The Tucson clinic will also provide a setting to train medical students, residents and fellows. The Lovell Foundation awarded $300,000 in honor of Lura Lovell as part of the In Honor of Our Mothers fundraising campaign. To date $1.3 million of the $2.5 million needed has been raised. Previously the Lovell Foundation awarded AzCIM $1.6 million, including a multi-year commitment to establish the Institute on Place and Well-Being, headed by Dr. Esther Sternberg.
  • Arizona Public Media was awarded $198,250 for two projects. One will continue to co-fund a producer/reporter for mental health. In 2012 the Lovell Foundation funded this project for three years. During that time reporter Gisela Telis produced numerous award-winning mini-documentaries on mental health issues for AZPM. The AzPM award includes $98,250 to support this position for another three years. The other $100,000 will be used to develop a documentary on death and dying to educate people about the resources available for end-of-life care and coping with death and grief. AZPM will work with community partners to develop outreach and educational opportunities.

Other substantial grants awarded in 2015 include:

  • $80,000 for St. Elizabeth’s Health Center, providing medical, dental and healthcare for the uninsured and underserved since 1961, staffed by volunteer physicians, nurses, dentists and hygienists.
  • $50,000 over two years for NAMI of Southern Arizona, an organization that advocates, educates and offers support to people living with mental illness and their families.
  • $45,000 for the Southern Arizona AIDS Foundation to develop an online merchant website for vitamins and supplements to reach extremely underserved rural communities of Southeastern Arizona.
  • $35,000 to HOPE, Inc., a treatment center for people with behavioral health disorders, to develop a Young Adult Peer Music Program, based on the success of a project previously funded by The Lovell Foundation.

Additional grants are:

  • $15,000 to Social Venture Partners Tucson
  • $12,150 to the Women’s Foundation of Southern Arizona
  • $12,000 to UApresents
  • $10,000 each to the Arizona Theatre Company, Tucson Museum of Art and Tucson Symphony Orchestra
  • $8,000 to Invisible Theatre

The Lovell Foundation also made awards to support projects of special interest to its family members. Those grants total $75,000 including:

  • $30,000 to support CNN student journalist training to extend outreach and awareness of “The Hunting Ground,” a documentary film about rape on college campuses in the United States.
  • $20,000 for The Children’s Center in Salt Lake City. This center focuses on mental health care for families with young children.
  • $10,000 for Challenge Day in San Francisco, which provides youth and their communities with experiential programs that celebrate of diversity, truth and full expression.
  • $10,000 for Demand Abolition, a national initiative focused on reducing the demand for sex trafficking. This year Phoenix became the 11th pilot city to join a collaborate coalition of community leaders, criminal justice professionals, activists, survivors, researchers and philanthropists.
  • $10,000 for the Tucson Public Voices Op-Ed Project, training women to use their expertise to write and publish op-ed articles.
  • $5,000 for equipment and supplies for the Mexico Dental Mission , a Phoenix- based organization providing dental services to communities in Mexico several times each year.

Going forward, the Lovell Foundation now has more resources and can better support nonprofits – not just for projects and programs – but also in ways that can help these organizations evolve and expand their capacity to better serve their communities,” said Ann Lovell, foundation president. “This round of foundational grant awards reflects that new focus, as well as our ongoing commitment to the nonprofits with whom we have partnered for many years.”

Background

In the early 1990s, David and Lura Lovell were planning to establish a family foundation with proceeds from the sale of the chemical company David founded and grew for 25 years in Toledo, Ohio. When David died unexpectedly, his wife Lura and daughter Ann moved the foundation forward.

Since 1994, the Lovell family foundation has awarded more than $13 million in grants to support the four pillars of its mission to support mental health, integrative medicine, cultural/spiritual enrichment and philanthropic education. Over the past 20 years the Lovell Foundation has partnered with 60 nonprofits in local communities, including 20 in Tucson, plus a few projects that were national in scope.

The foundation is in its second year of transition since the death of Lura Lovell in September, 2013, and during this time is only accepting proposals from its current grantee partners. The foundation is also under-going an executive search and hopes to have the new executive director named by the end of the summer.

Lovell Foundation Selects John Amoroso as Executive Director

TUCSON, AZ – John Amoroso is the new executive director of the David and Lura Lovell Foundation, which was founded in 1994 and is based in Tucson.

The family foundation supports nonprofit projects related to mental health, integrative medicine, cultural and spiritual enrichment and other family-initiated grants. In 2015 the foundation awarded more than $2 million to 15 nonprofits in Tucson, 6 in Toledo, Ohio, and several national projects.

Over the past 15 years, Amoroso has successfully managed multi-million-dollar grant portfolios from the design to the reporting phase. He’s collaborated with executive staff, boards of directors and community partners on high-impact philanthropy and worked directly with nonprofits across the West on management, fundraising and capacity building.

Amoroso has served as program officer for The Ford Family Foundation, Oregon’s largest private foundation, funding more than $30 million in grants and scholarships annually. He managed more than 180 responsive grants for rural youth in the areas of access to health and dental care, abuse prevention and positive development, as well as providing community meeting spaces for them. One key project was helping design and implement a seven-year, $7 million proactive grant encouraging post-secondary education in rural communities.

Most recently, he managed a region for the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board’s bi-annual responsive grant cycle for natural resource restoration and a statewide technical assistance grant for community collaboration on forestry issues. He has a master’s degree in nonprofit management from Regis University in Denver and received his bachelor’s degree in English from Carroll College in Helena, Montana.

“I believe I can add vision and enthusiasm to the Lovell Foundation’s efforts toward achieving high-impact giving goals,” he said, adding that “the Lovell Foundation’s interest areas and office location both spoke to my heart.” His extended family has spent many years advocating for and pioneering integrative approaches to personal wellbeing – including mental, physical, and spiritual health. A move to Tucson will bring him closer to family and fulfill his career goal of leading a foundation.

“John is a skilled administrator and relationship builder and brings to the position a deep understanding of both our key mission areas and our goals to increase impact in the communities we serve. The foundation is excited to welcome him as our new executive director and community leader,” said Ann Lovell, foundation president and trustee.

The Lovell Foundation is governed by three second-generation trustees and a board of advisors that includes family members and non-family members with expertise in law, accounting, asset management, education, mental health and nonprofit administration.

Since 1994, the Lovell family foundation awarded more than $13 million in grants, partnering with more than with 60 nonprofit organizations locally and nationally. The foundation was established with proceeds from the sale of the chemical company David Lovell founded and grew for 25 years in Toledo, Ohio. After he died unexpectedly, his wife Lura and daughter Ann moved the foundation forward.

Lovell Foundation Awards More Than $2 Million in 2015

In 2015 The Lovell Foundation awarded more than $2 million in grants to 30 nonprofit organizations – including 15 in Tucson, 6 in Toledo and 9 that were special interest projects initiated by second and third generation Lovell family members.

The largest grant in 2015 was $620,000 to Interfaith Community Services.

July awards
January awards

Interfaith Community Services received awards for two projects over the next three years. A grant for $560,000 will establish a program that connects faith communities with healthcare facilities to provide support for at-risk and vulnerable patients who need non-medical support after discharge from the hospital. Such support has been shown to reduce re-admissions and improve quality of care and patient satisfaction. This is modeled on a successful evidence-based program in Tennessee. The second grant provides $60,000 for ICS to continue to provide mental health training in the community to help people learn the facts about and recognize the signs of mental illness.

Campus rape

The signs of an avalanche were stirring at last month’s Sundance Film Festival, one that could have especially strong reverberations for everyone who is concerned about promoting social change—including activists, donors, and fundraisers. That low rumble you hear comes from the premiere of “The Hunting Ground,” a film about sexual violence on campuses that has the potential to take activism to a new level, especially among philanthropists and lawmakers.http://philanthropy.com/article/Film-on-Campus-Rape-Could-Take/151617/?cid=p

Tucson Public Voices/The OpEd Project

“The goal of the Public Voices Fellowship Program is to increase the public impact of our nation’s top thinkers, with an emphasis on the thinkers who are most underrepresented, including women,” said Katie Orenstein, who created the OpEd Project in 2008.

Lovell was determined to bring the program to Tucson after meeting Orenstein at a Women Moving Millions meeting in Dallas two and a half years ago. At the event, Orenstein asked the room of women to name what they were an expert at — and why.

Video Training women to think as thought leaders